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Concrete Kitchen Countertops

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Concrete Kitchen Countertops

Mix and Pour the Concrete Watch video of this step. For our 12-square-foot countertop, we needed three 60-pound bags of ready-mix concrete. Add water to the concrete and mix with a shovel per the manufacturer’s instructions. If you want to add color to the countertop, now’s the time to add pigment to the mix. Pigment additives come in powder or liquid. Liquid pigments are easy to measure and mix, especially with small concrete batches like this one. But don’t forget to account for the amount of water in the pigment when measuring the water for the concrete. Controlling the amount of water added to the concrete mix is critical to producing consistent color. Refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines. Mixing the concrete correctly is critical to its strength and durability. When it achieves the texture of peanut butter it’s time to add it to the mold. Remember that the concrete at the bottom of mold will become the top of the concrete slab. Using a small spade or bucket, pour the concrete into the mold, pressing and compacting it as you fill the mold to a depth of about 1 inch or halfway full. Set the galvanized wire into the concrete, taking care that it does not touch the edges of the mold. The wire will keep the concrete from cracking as it dries and it will also add strength. Continue to fill the mold on top of the wire, tamping the concrete with a trowel, as you go along to ensure it is well-packed. Your objective is to slightly overfill the mold. The level of concrete will drop slightly in the mold as it settles. Smooth the concrete surface with a hand trowel. This will draw the aggregates to the top. To settle the concrete, use an orbital sander without sandpaper against the sides of the mold. The vibrations will help bring air bubbles in the concrete up to the surface. When finished, gently cover the countertop with a sheet of plastic or damp burlap to protect it from dust and dirt. Let the concrete cure at least a week—the more it cures, the stronger it gets.
concrete kitchen countertops 1

Concrete Kitchen Countertops

Watch video of this step. For our 12-square-foot countertop, we needed three 60-pound bags of ready-mix concrete. Add water to the concrete and mix with a shovel per the manufacturer’s instructions. If you want to add color to the countertop, now’s the time to add pigment to the mix. Pigment additives come in powder or liquid. Liquid pigments are easy to measure and mix, especially with small concrete batches like this one. But don’t forget to account for the amount of water in the pigment when measuring the water for the concrete. Controlling the amount of water added to the concrete mix is critical to producing consistent color. Refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines. Mixing the concrete correctly is critical to its strength and durability. When it achieves the texture of peanut butter it’s time to add it to the mold. Remember that the concrete at the bottom of mold will become the top of the concrete slab. Using a small spade or bucket, pour the concrete into the mold, pressing and compacting it as you fill the mold to a depth of about 1 inch or halfway full. Set the galvanized wire into the concrete, taking care that it does not touch the edges of the mold. The wire will keep the concrete from cracking as it dries and it will also add strength. Continue to fill the mold on top of the wire, tamping the concrete with a trowel, as you go along to ensure it is well-packed. Your objective is to slightly overfill the mold. The level of concrete will drop slightly in the mold as it settles. Smooth the concrete surface with a hand trowel. This will draw the aggregates to the top. To settle the concrete, use an orbital sander without sandpaper against the sides of the mold. The vibrations will help bring air bubbles in the concrete up to the surface. When finished, gently cover the countertop with a sheet of plastic or damp burlap to protect it from dust and dirt. Let the concrete cure at least a week—the more it cures, the stronger it gets.
concrete kitchen countertops 2

Concrete Kitchen Countertops

Next Up How to Install a Countertop Learn how to fit, cut and install a new countertop, and how to join two countertops together. How to Install a Granite Kitchen Countertop Granite, like most natural stones, can be expensive. But you can save between 20 percent and 30 percent off a professional installation by doing it yourself. How to Install a Concrete Floor Laying an interior concrete floor is usually a renovation project that takes place in your basement. Learn how to remove an old wood floor, prepare a base and pour a concrete floor. How to Install a Tile Backsplash Install new ceramic, porcelain, glass or stone tiles above a countertop to brighten a kitchen or bath. How to Install a Plank Tile Floor Instead of standard square tile, consider rectangular plank tile. They can make a narrow room look larger by running with the room’s width. How to Install a Laminate Floating Floor Installing laminate flooring is a snap — literally. A laminate floor is a “floating floor,” meaning it is not fastened directly to the subfloor. It can be installed over any other tightly bonded flooring, making it ideal for retrofits. How to Create a Venetian Plaster Backsplash Venetian plaster is an easy, inexpensive option for adding color and texture to your walls. Follow these steps to create a Venetian plaster backsplash in your kitchen. How to Wallpaper a Room Wallpaper adds a decorative element to any room. Follow these step-by-step instructions for hanging wallpaper on a flat wall and around windows and doors. How to Create and Install Concrete Countertops Concrete countertops are becoming more and more popular, mainly because natural stone is durable. How to Pour a Simple Concrete Countertop To create a simple concrete countertop, DIY experts show how to build the forms, prepare the concrete mix, pour the concrete and get it in shape to cure.
concrete kitchen countertops 3

Concrete Kitchen Countertops

How to Install a Countertop Learn how to fit, cut and install a new countertop, and how to join two countertops together. How to Install a Granite Kitchen Countertop Granite, like most natural stones, can be expensive. But you can save between 20 percent and 30 percent off a professional installation by doing it yourself. How to Install a Concrete Floor Laying an interior concrete floor is usually a renovation project that takes place in your basement. Learn how to remove an old wood floor, prepare a base and pour a concrete floor. How to Install a Tile Backsplash Install new ceramic, porcelain, glass or stone tiles above a countertop to brighten a kitchen or bath. How to Install a Plank Tile Floor Instead of standard square tile, consider rectangular plank tile. They can make a narrow room look larger by running with the room’s width. How to Install a Laminate Floating Floor Installing laminate flooring is a snap — literally. A laminate floor is a “floating floor,” meaning it is not fastened directly to the subfloor. It can be installed over any other tightly bonded flooring, making it ideal for retrofits. How to Create a Venetian Plaster Backsplash Venetian plaster is an easy, inexpensive option for adding color and texture to your walls. Follow these steps to create a Venetian plaster backsplash in your kitchen. How to Wallpaper a Room Wallpaper adds a decorative element to any room. Follow these step-by-step instructions for hanging wallpaper on a flat wall and around windows and doors. How to Create and Install Concrete Countertops Concrete countertops are becoming more and more popular, mainly because natural stone is durable. How to Pour a Simple Concrete Countertop To create a simple concrete countertop, DIY experts show how to build the forms, prepare the concrete mix, pour the concrete and get it in shape to cure.
concrete kitchen countertops 4

Concrete Kitchen Countertops

Concrete countertops are a handcrafted surface popular in kitchens that offer complete customization. With concrete you can have a functional and beautiful countertop in small and large kitchens alike. The ability to create counters in the color, finish, size and shape of your choice is amazing. Casting a concrete countertop yourself is a very complex DIY project. The counters shown here were created by professional contractors in a shop with specialized tools and equipment. It’s well known by now that concrete has become a material that homeowners and designers are requesting and weaving into their homes, offices, retail outlets, restaurants, etc., in the most amazing ways. But leading the charge in the concrete craze are concrete countertops. Now you can find out why they are so popular, how you can make their versatility work for you, what color options abound, and some insight into how they are designed, created and built. And don’t forget, you can get some amazing ideas for your project in The Concrete Network’s concrete countertop photo gallery, so you’ll know just what you want when you’re ready to hire a contractor.

Concrete Kitchen Countertops

Concrete Kitchen Countertops
Concrete Kitchen Countertops

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