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How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

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How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

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how to tile a kitchen countertop 1

How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

How to Install a Level Countertop Here’s how to remove a slanted countertop, cut a replacement and install it so the counter is nice and level. Outdoor Kitchen Island with Concrete Countertop A sturdy cooking center turns a plain barbecue area into a stylish outdoor kitchen. How to Give a Laminate Countertop a Faux Marble Finish Apply a layer of elegance to your laminate countertop with these step-by-step instructions. Do-It-Yourself Butcher-Block Kitchen Countertop Swap dated laminate for a classic butcher-block countertop. Unlike stone or solid surface, butcher block can be fabricated in a basement or garage workshop, making it the perfect DIY project to totally transform your kitchen on a budget. Close Off a Door to Create a Kitchen Workspace Finding extra space in the kitchen could be as easy as removing a doorway. How to Build a Breakfast Bar Open up a kitchen and add storage with an open breakfast bar backed by cabinets. How to Create A Colorful Glass Tile Backsplash Create a custom kitchen backsplash with inexpensive glass tiles and marbles. This colorful, geometric design will give your kitchen a bright, fresh look. Laminate Countertop Crack Home repair expert Henry Harrison shows a homeowner how to repair a crack in the curved backsplash of a laminate countertop. How To: Creating A Holographic Checkerboard Backsplash Create a checkerboard kitchen backsplash using stick-on holographic tiles. Mixing colors and designs gives your kitchen visual appeal. How to Make a Kitchen Island Kitchen organization is made easy with this simple, inexpensive DIY project. HGTV Magazine shows you how to repurpose an old console table into a stylish kitchen island.
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How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

Set the Countertop Tile Tile around the sink area first. Lay out a few tiles without adhesive. Determine your starting point by starting at the edge of the counter, leaving room for the edge tiles, and placing tiles back toward the backsplash until you end with the last whole tile close to the backsplash. Mark that point. Draw a line representing the row of whole tiles closest to the backsplash. Draw perpendicular lines representing the rows of tiles (Image 1). Do the same thing from the sink side of the countertop. Where those two points intersect is where angle cuts are needed. You will be transferring these angled lines to the tiles. Lay whole tiles out along the marks. An easy way to mark the tiles is to use a straightedge to line up with your mark on the countertop and strike a line across the tiles (Image 2). Use a wet saw to cut along the marks (Image 3). Once your tile layout for a corner has been determined, precut those tiles and then check your cuts to see if they match your layout. If not, there is still plenty of time to get it right. Use a latex modified thin-set adhesive for this type of application. With the trowel, lay out a thin scratch coat along the counter (Image 4), being careful to keep the lines visible for now. Begin setting the tiles at the left side of the intersecting (Image 5) line. With the tiles set to the left of the line you are now able to marry the tiles to the right of the angle (Image 6). Using spacers in the grout joints of a tile layout helps ensure consistency throughout the entire job. Set the whole tiles and make necessary cuts as needed. Work your way to the opposite corner to the right of the sink. The rest of the counter should consist mostly of whole tiles. When you have a straight area to cover, you can spread out the thin-set over the entire area at once. Use the comb edge of the trowel to create grooves in the mortar that run in the same direction (Image 7). Lay the rest of the tiles. It is important to set the tile into position and slide it into place by gently pushing it in the opposite direction than the notches are running. Repeat the process by adding spacers in the corners and between the tiles along the sides. This will ensure consistency in the width of the grout joints. Due to the rounded (half-bullnose) edges of the countertop, place 1/8” x 2” shims underneath the tiles along the perimeter of the countertop (Image 8). This will allow for a slightly thicker layer of adhesive to be laid under the counter edge tile. When you install the edge tiles (Image 9) be sure and fill all voids between the tile and the laminate with mortar. The shims keep the edges from moving once you set them in place. Once the thin-set cures, the edge pieces will not be going anywhere.
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How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

Prep the Old Countertop To prep the countertop to receive the tile, round corners need to be squared off and the countertop surface has to be sanded to provide a better surface for the tile adhesive. To square off the corners of the round-cornered laminate countertop, mark a line 3-1/4” in from edge. Clamp the level down to use as a cutting guide (Image 1). Cut off the end of the counter with a circular saw (Image 2). To build up a square end to set tile on, you may need to screw a piece of trim (cut to the thickness of the counter) onto the trimmed counter edge (Image 3). Check for good stability on the countertops. Anywhere the countertop moves or gives way – like the thin lip in front of the sink — install a brace or support piece and secure it in place (Image 4). Countertop laminates are typically made from nonporous materials. In order to make thin-set adhere to that surface, make the laminate more porous by using an electric sander to sand its surface. Use a palm sander or an orbital sander with a 50-grit paper to rough up – without gouging — the existing laminate countertop (Image 5). This creates more texture on the surface and promotes a better bond for the thin-set adhesive.
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How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

Tile around the sink area first. Lay out a few tiles without adhesive. Determine your starting point by starting at the edge of the counter, leaving room for the edge tiles, and placing tiles back toward the backsplash until you end with the last whole tile close to the backsplash. Mark that point. Draw a line representing the row of whole tiles closest to the backsplash. Draw perpendicular lines representing the rows of tiles (Image 1). Do the same thing from the sink side of the countertop. Where those two points intersect is where angle cuts are needed. You will be transferring these angled lines to the tiles. Lay whole tiles out along the marks. An easy way to mark the tiles is to use a straightedge to line up with your mark on the countertop and strike a line across the tiles (Image 2). Use a wet saw to cut along the marks (Image 3). Once your tile layout for a corner has been determined, precut those tiles and then check your cuts to see if they match your layout. If not, there is still plenty of time to get it right. Use a latex modified thin-set adhesive for this type of application. With the trowel, lay out a thin scratch coat along the counter (Image 4), being careful to keep the lines visible for now. Begin setting the tiles at the left side of the intersecting (Image 5) line. With the tiles set to the left of the line you are now able to marry the tiles to the right of the angle (Image 6). Using spacers in the grout joints of a tile layout helps ensure consistency throughout the entire job. Set the whole tiles and make necessary cuts as needed. Work your way to the opposite corner to the right of the sink. The rest of the counter should consist mostly of whole tiles. When you have a straight area to cover, you can spread out the thin-set over the entire area at once. Use the comb edge of the trowel to create grooves in the mortar that run in the same direction (Image 7). Lay the rest of the tiles. It is important to set the tile into position and slide it into place by gently pushing it in the opposite direction than the notches are running. Repeat the process by adding spacers in the corners and between the tiles along the sides. This will ensure consistency in the width of the grout joints. Due to the rounded (half-bullnose) edges of the countertop, place 1/8” x 2” shims underneath the tiles along the perimeter of the countertop (Image 8). This will allow for a slightly thicker layer of adhesive to be laid under the counter edge tile. When you install the edge tiles (Image 9) be sure and fill all voids between the tile and the laminate with mortar. The shims keep the edges from moving once you set them in place. Once the thin-set cures, the edge pieces will not be going anywhere.

How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop
How To Tile A Kitchen Countertop

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