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Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

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Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

Studio 212 Interiors Shaker. The Shaker-style cabinet door is the most common door style in kitchens today. This five-piece flat-panel style has a frame made from four pieces and a single flat center panel for the fifth piece. Shaker cabinetry gets its name from the distinctive Shaker furniture style, which uses simple, clean lines and emphasizes utility. Shaker-style doors became popular because their simple style lends itself to just about any decor — from contemporary to traditional — with variations in wood species, stains, paint colors and hardware. This classic style can work with a variety of budgets, depending on the wood used. Some manufacturers can even replace the center door panel with a more cost-effective material. Using a natural finish rather than a painted one could save you up to 20 percent on your purchase, too. Georgetown Development Louvered. Horizontal wood slats are typically used on windows, furniture pieces and interior doors, but they add a distinct architectural style to kitchen cabinetry. However, be aware that these beauties come with a heavy price tag.Many louvered doors have spaces between each slat, making them great for cabinets that require ventilation — like a cabinet near a radiator, a dedicated clothes drying cabinet in a laundry room or cabinetry for cable boxes and DVD players. Applegate Tran Interiors Flat. Simple but stylish, the flat-panel cabinet door is void of any expensive details. Its hard lines and minimalist form make it a great fit for contemporary and modern interiors.Many flat doors come in decorative laminate or wood. Laminate tends to be more budget friendly and offers a greater variety of colors and sheens. Dresser Homes Inset. Although this style tends to be one of the most expensive on the market, it’s a classic look that’ll last for generations. The inset door gets its name because it is set inside of the cabinet frame — typical cabinet doors rest on the outside of the frame. The door is designed and constructed with extremely precise measurements so that it nests inside the frame and opens and closes properly, even when the wood expands and contracts. This door style usually requires exposed hinges rather than the typical concealed hinges of other door styles that are included in the cost of the cabinet box. Make sure that your budget takes this into account — two hinges per door will quickly add up. GDC Construction Distressed. If you’ve always dreamed of having an antique-style kitchen, then you’ll love the distressed-looking cabinets available from most manufacturers. Choose any door style and opt to have the corners rubbed off or have other distressing techniques done for that age-old feeling. All this extra work will cost you, though; there’s usually a 15 to 20 percent upcharge for a tradesperson to actually destroy your brand-new doors. Pinto Designs and Associates Beadboard. Love cottage style? It doesn’t get more cottage chic than beadboard. The center panel of the cabinet doors in this style are made to look like traditional beadboard paneling. Beadboard was used in the past as a decorative wall treatment before plaster, drywall and paint became common. While all-white beadboard cabinetry can give your kitchen a bright and clean feel, all the little cracks and crevasses on this door style can be a pain to keep clean. JMA INTERIOR DESIGN Thermofoil. These doors are molded out of MDF (medium-density fiberboard), wrapped in a plastic-type coating and then baked under intense heat to create an impervious seal. Durable and cost effective, they come only in solid colors and imitation wood grain. Often mass-produced, thermofoil cabinetry comes at very competitive price points. It’s durable, but it’s also extremely difficult to repair any damage to it. Some lighter colors can also yellow from sunlight and heat over time. Frederick + Frederick Architects Custom. Can’t find any door style on the market that really complements your unique design intention? Design your own! Contact a local designer or craftsperson to help you create a personalized design. This Shaker-style cabinet door has a center panel of corrugated metal instead of wood for an industrial and utilitarian look that can stand up to years of abuse.More help choosing kitchen cabinets and hardware
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Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

× Door Styles Arch An arch style door features a rounded arch at the top of the door panel, which may be either raised or recessed. Compare with a square style. Square A square style door features a straight perimeter frame around the center panel, which may be either raised or recessed. Compare with an arch style. Slab A slab style door is a flat door without a raised or recessed panel. Recessed Panel A recessed panel door has a flat panel recessed inside the perimeter of a door. Compare to a raised panel door. Raised Panel A raised panel door features a more decorative center panel that rises in the center. Compare to a recessed panel door.
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Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

× Finish Techniques Burnished Finish Process Burnished finishes create a warm, traditional look, resulting in unique, fine-furniture detailing on cabinetry. This multi-step process includes an artistic over-sanding technique to create the aged look of fine furniture, randomly applied worm holes and compression marks to add additional distressing, and a dark burnishing stain artistically applied to all raised or profiled portions of doors and drawer fronts. The burnishing stain is followed by a base color stain, which is then hand-wiped to reveal the inherent beauty and natural characteristics of the wood. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Because this process features several different techniques, the detail and look will vary from piece to piece. Suede Finish Process Suede topcoat is a softened sheen that provides the same resistance to scuffs, dents, moisture, UV fade and household chemicals as our standard topcoat. The suede topcoat is standard on distressed finishes, and available on certain other finishes. Talk to your kitchen designer about the best finishes and finish techniques to get the look you love. Distressed Finish Process The distressed technique replicates the look of reclaimed wood. Using proprietary techniques, our skilled artisans carefully hand-distress and detail every door so each one is unique. A dark burnishing stain is carefully brushed onto corners and select raised areas. After the stain is hand-rubbed into the wood, a durable matte suede topcoat is used to complete the distressed look. Highlight Finish Process Highlighted finishes feature a standard stain that is “highlighted” with hand-applied glaze color in the recessed areas of doors and drawer fronts. This unique process does not alter the base color of the door, yet adds an additional highlight color to enhance the profiles and recesses of the door design. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Stain or Paint with Glaze Finish Process Glazed finishes add richness and warmth to wood surfaces. The base stain or paint finish is applied followed by the application of a glaze finish to the entire door or drawer front. The glaze is then hand-wiped to create a soft, light “hang up” in profiles and recesses of the wood. Each door design, wood species and glaze finish has its own charming character and will create a unique, one-of-a-kind look. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Painted Finish Process Painted finishes feature several coats of a heavily pigmented stain using an automated application process. These finishes are semi-opaque, meaning some of the natural beauty of the wood grain may show through the painted finish. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Stain Finish Process Stained finishes showcase the inherent natural beauty and characteristics of each individual wood species. The stain is applied and hand-rubbed to ensure full and equal color coverage. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Thermofoil Finish Process Available in white or soft cream, Thermofoil cabinet doors feature a flawless, silky-smooth surface. Thermofoil material is applied to medium-density fiberboard (MDF) using an intense heat and pressure-bonding process to ensure durability. Thermofoil finish is made of laminate and provides a uniform look from door to door. Vintage Finish Process Vintage finishes give the appearance of heirloom cabinetry that has been well-loved and used through the years. This multi-step process includes an artistic over-sanding technique to create the aged look of fine furniture, randomly applied worm holes and compression marks to add additional distressing, and the application of several coats of paint. The corners and edges of doors and drawers are over-sanded for a second time, revealing the beauty of natural wood. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Because this process features several different techniques, the detail and look will vary from piece to piece. Vintage Patina Finish Process Vintage Patina finishes give the appearance of heirloom cabinetry that has been well-loved and used through the years. This multi-step process includes the same steps as the Vintage Finish process followed by a hand-wiped penetrating glaze that adds richness and creates a soft “hang up” in profiles and recesses of the door and drawers. As a final step, our oven-cured DuraKraft topcoat is applied to provide a beautiful and durable furniture finish. Because this process features several different techniques, the detail and look will vary from piece to piece. Aged Finish Process Our Aged technique evokes the look of artisan-finished cabinetry that has been well loved over time. Distressing effects are hand applied artisan methods that are random and inconsistent in appearance. Because every detail is hand applied, each finished component will have a unique appearance. The effects include edge rasping, worm holes, edge burnishing, softened corners and edges, random dent patterns and a suede topcoat.

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

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