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Kitchen Cabinet Government

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Kitchen Cabinet Government

WASHINGTON, Oct. 15— They had been with Ronald Reagan from the start. They urged him to run for Governor of California, they helped finance his campaign and they oversaw the selection of his advisers. Then, when Mr. Reagan ran and was elected President, they did it again. But now, with Mr. Reagan in the White House and with the top Government jobs filled, the Kitchen Cabinet that saw him through so much has faded from the Washington scene as quickly as it appeared. The last time its members met as a group was more than seven months ago, at a surprise 70th birthday party that Nancy Reagan staged for her husband. ”The Kitchen Cabinet is out of business,” said Justin Dart, the Dart & Kraft Inc. executive committee chairman who was the informal head of the group. ”We never have a meeting. We haven’t any business to perform. He’s got a full staff out East, and he sure doesn’t want the Kitchen Cabinet meeting next to the Cabinet Room.” The Reagan Kitchen Cabinet, like earlier versions dating to the group assembled by Andrew Jackson a century and a half ago, consists of old, trusted friends who share the President’s philosophy. In Mr. Reagan’s case, they are men much like the President himself – selfmade millionaires who had gone West to earn their fortunes and who, along the way, became interested in politics. Involvement in Fund Raising After the 1980 election, they filled the ranks of Mr. Reagan’s Transition Appointments Committee and helped select members of the Cabinet. After the Inauguration, many of them joined in an ill-fated fund-raising project called the Coalition for a New Beginning, which was disbanded at White House urging after some companies complained that they were being pressured to join the effort to promote the Reagan economic plan. A handful of them did win Government jobs. One, William French Smith, went from the Kitchen Cabinet to the real Cabinet as Attorney General. Other Kitchen Cabinet members sprinkled through the Government include Charles Z. Wick, a lawyer, producer and entrepreneur who now heads the International Communications Agency; William A. Wilson, an investor who is emissary to the Vatican, and Theodore Cummings, an immigrant from Austria, who has returned as United States Ambassador to Austria. Otherwise, Administration officials and group members alike agree, members of the Kitchen Cabinet have little if any political influence in the White House. They still have the President’s ear, but they are more likely to discuss their recent foreign trips than new initiatives in foreign policy. Today the group is more of a Kitchen Klatch than Kitchen Cabinet. ‘It’s Not the Same’ ”It’s a social thing at this point,” said Helene von Damm, a deputy Presidential assistant who until this month was Mr. Reagan’s personal secretary. ”Things are so busy that it’s not the same. There isn’t the time.” No single group has developed to replace the Kitchen Cabinet in the heart and mind of the President. Socially, Mr. Reagan sees members of Congress and other Government and political figures at the White House or, occasionally, at the theater. Politically, he relies on the so-called ”Big Three.” The Presidential counselor, Edwin Meese 3d; the White House chief of staff, James A. Baker 3d, and the deputy chief of staff, Michael K. Deaver, see the President with the greatest regularity. Both Mr. Meese and Mr. Deaver have been longtime associates of Mr. Reagan, but they have a different relationship with him than did members of the Kitchen Cabinet. They are aides first, friends second. Not that members of the Kitchen Cabinet feel slighted. Mrs. Reagan speaks often with Betsy Bloomingdale, whose husband, Alfred, is a member of the Kitchen Cabinet. The Bloomingdales took an apartment at the Watergate to remain close to the Reagans. The California Connection The Reagans also socialize with their old friends when they are in California. Often, according to Reagan intimates, Mrs. Reagan will telephone old friends in California and then hand the receiver to Mr. Reagan. ”We’re in close touch, but we’re not as close as before,” said Mr. Tuttle. ”He’s the President now and has 50 states to worry about.” They are more selective about calling Mr. Reagan now. Each of them, however, spoke with the President shortly after he was shot. ”I’m the kind of guy who doesn’t want to trespass on a fellow as busy as that, so I don’t call him unless I have something worthwhile to say,” said Mr. Dart. ”I find him the same Ronald Reagan I knew 35 years ago. He’s just as homey as he ever was.”
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Kitchen Cabinet Government

Kitchen Cabinet History for kidsThe Kitchen Cabinet history revolved around the scandal known as the Petticoat affair or the Peggy Eaton affair. Peggy Eaton had married John Eaton, the Secretary of War. The marriage, and the morals of Peggy Eaton, were highly criticized by the highest society in Washington D.C. including the Cabinet social circle and even his niece and First Lady Emily Donelson. Andrew Jackson supported the Eaton’s and was furious at the gossip and the bad publicity which had become a liability for the Democrats. The President asked for the resignations of his disloyal cabinet, including that of his vice president John C. Calhoun. Secretary of State, Martin Van Buren, emerged unscathed, he was the only unmarried cabinet member and was not involved in the scandal. Why did Jackson have a Kitchen Cabinet?Andrew Jackson had had enough of the vicious tongues in Washington. His recently deceased wife, Rachel Donelson Jackson, had also suffered due to the spiteful, wagging tongues of Washington society had accused her of adultery and bigamy. He abandoned official cabinet meetings and used the heads of departments solely to execute their departmental duties. Instead, he sought the advice of old personal friends from Tennessee and loyal newspaper editors. Andrew Jackson believed that only the President could be trusted to stand for the will of the working people against the upper-class Congress and used his power of veto more often than all six previous Presidents combined. Their meetings were informal, they smoked their pipes together and formed his “kitchen cabinet.” He rarely called an official cabinet meeting and when he did it was usually to tell the members what he had decided to do. The official cabinet was given the nickname of the “parlor cabinet”. Who made up Jackson’s Kitchen Cabinet?Andrew Jackson’s Kitchen Cabinet consisted of his loyal friends, journalists and newspaper editors. The term “Kitchen Cabinet” might sound cozy and friendly but its members were all extremely powerful and clever men. The names of the most influential members of the Kitchen Cabinet were:Martin Van Buren who had supported Jackson through the Peggy Eaton scandalJohn Eaton who had been the subject of the gossipFrancis Preston Blair, editor of the Washington GlobeDuff Green, editor of the highly influent United States Telegraph (he later supported Calhoun)Amos Kendall a lawyer, journalist and editor-in-chief of the Argus of Western AmericaImportant William Berkeley Lewis who had served as quartermaster under General Andrew JacksonIsaac Hill a politician and editor of the New Hampshire Patriot newspaperGeneral Roger B. Taney, politician, Attorney General and Chief Justice
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Kitchen Cabinet Government

The Kitchen Cabinet was a mocking term applied to an official circle of advisers to President Andrew Jackson. The term has endured through many decades, and now generally refers to a politician's informal circle of advisers. When Jackson came into office after the bruising election of 1828, he was very distrustful of official Washington. As part of his anti-establish actions, he tended to dismiss government officials who had held the same jobs for years. And in an apparent effort to ensure that power rested with the president, not other people in the government, Jackson appointed fairly obscure or ineffectual men to most of the posts in his cabinet.The only man considered to possess any real political stature in Jackson's cabinet was Martin Van Buren, who was appointed secretary of state. )Van Buren had been a very influential figure in politics in New York State, and his ability to bring northern voters in line with Jackson's frontier appeal helped Jackson win the presidency.)The real power in Jackson's administration rested with a circle of friends and political cronies who often did not hold official office.As Jackson was always a controversial figure, thanks largely to his violent past and mercurial temperament. And opposition newspapers, implying there was something nefarious about the president receiving much unofficial advice, came up with the play on words, Kitchen Cabinet, to describe the informal group. The official cabinet was sometimes called the Parlor Cabinet.The Kitchen Cabinet included newspaper editors, political supporters, and old friends of Jackson's. They tended to support him in such efforts as the Bank War, and the implementation of the Spoils System.Jackson's informal group of advisers became more powerful as Jackson tended to become estranged from people within his own administration. His own vice president, John C. Calhoun, for example, rebelled against Jackson's policies and resigned.In later presidential administrations the term Kitchen Cabinet took on a less derisive meaning, and simply came to be used to denote a president's informal advisers. In modern usage, the kitchen cabinet has lost any suggestion of impropriety, as modern presidents are generally expected to rely on a wide range of individuals for advice.

Kitchen Cabinet Government

Kitchen Cabinet Government
Kitchen Cabinet Government
Kitchen Cabinet Government
Kitchen Cabinet Government

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