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Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors

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Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo PRO eagledzines / Linda Mayo I owned a custom cabinet shop and I would make unfinished cabinets for someone if they asked for it. I have been retired for a few years so I would very much like to know how MDF has improved. .(BTW– MDF means medium density fiberboard. It is actually wood fibers that are bound together in a resin. It is the resin that makes it hard. If the resin breaks down, it falls apart. Also, thermofoil is a shrink wrap around MDF.) The pros of MDF is that is doesn’t not shrink and it is harder. The material is cheaper to manufacture cabinets from. Whether or not that savings in cost is passed on to you, depends on the cabinetmaker. If it is used on the inside panel of a door, it will not shrink. The cons of MDF are that if you ever decide you want real wood, you can’t strip it. The shelves WILL eventually bend. If because of cost, you decide to go with MDF anyway, make sure you periodically turn the shelves upside down to offset this sagging. If you do decide on an MDF face frame, make sure you get plywood shelves, laminated to match the interior or if the interior is natural lacquer then stay with that for the shelves. The MDF I am familiar with is harder than wood but absorbs water faster. As was stated, the finish sits on top of the material and doesn’t sink into the wood. While it’s true that water damage can seep into wood as well as MDF, I have heard of too many more ruined cabinets that were MDF than wood. It is, in my opinion, more quickly damaged. Part of the reason for that is that the finish sits on top and doesn’t become part of the wood. The pros of wood are of course, the feel and look of wood. Also, if this is a kitchen you want to keep for a very long time, I would go with wood. Trends in cabinetry are constantly changing. With wood you can strip it later if you decide you want a different finish down the road. If you have a solidly built set of cabinets, you can change the look and they will still be valuable later. With wood, the finish itself is impregnated in the wood helping it to resist stains and water. Keep in mind too, that if you have cabinets with a face frame, the backs of the frames are not usually finished. This leaves MDF exposed on the back and unfinished. Wood beats MDF as far as holding up to moisture. If you do decide to go with MDF I would suggest a European cabinet with no face frame. The cons of wood is that center panel on a door may shrink leaving an exposed finish line. I always gave my customers a touch up kit in case that happened. Not one ever came back to me with a problem. My experience with mitered doors has been the opposite. They don’t hold up as well to changes in temperature and separate more easily. I’ve had some sitting around the shop for a while in storage areas as well as stick and rails, and have problems with the mitered coming apart. The mitered are more expensive as well. If you go with a mitered door, make sure there is a tenon at the joint and it is pinned to give it extra support. Thermofoil doors come either as a one-piece door with a router making all the design or they can be made as a five-piece door. In my opinion, the one-piece doors look fake (because they are). 24 Likes Bookmark March 2, 2013 at 7:43AM
mdf kitchen cabinet doors 1

Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors

eagledzines / Linda Mayo I owned a custom cabinet shop and I would make unfinished cabinets for someone if they asked for it. I have been retired for a few years so I would very much like to know how MDF has improved. .(BTW– MDF means medium density fiberboard. It is actually wood fibers that are bound together in a resin. It is the resin that makes it hard. If the resin breaks down, it falls apart. Also, thermofoil is a shrink wrap around MDF.) The pros of MDF is that is doesn’t not shrink and it is harder. The material is cheaper to manufacture cabinets from. Whether or not that savings in cost is passed on to you, depends on the cabinetmaker. If it is used on the inside panel of a door, it will not shrink. The cons of MDF are that if you ever decide you want real wood, you can’t strip it. The shelves WILL eventually bend. If because of cost, you decide to go with MDF anyway, make sure you periodically turn the shelves upside down to offset this sagging. If you do decide on an MDF face frame, make sure you get plywood shelves, laminated to match the interior or if the interior is natural lacquer then stay with that for the shelves. The MDF I am familiar with is harder than wood but absorbs water faster. As was stated, the finish sits on top of the material and doesn’t sink into the wood. While it’s true that water damage can seep into wood as well as MDF, I have heard of too many more ruined cabinets that were MDF than wood. It is, in my opinion, more quickly damaged. Part of the reason for that is that the finish sits on top and doesn’t become part of the wood. The pros of wood are of course, the feel and look of wood. Also, if this is a kitchen you want to keep for a very long time, I would go with wood. Trends in cabinetry are constantly changing. With wood you can strip it later if you decide you want a different finish down the road. If you have a solidly built set of cabinets, you can change the look and they will still be valuable later. With wood, the finish itself is impregnated in the wood helping it to resist stains and water. Keep in mind too, that if you have cabinets with a face frame, the backs of the frames are not usually finished. This leaves MDF exposed on the back and unfinished. Wood beats MDF as far as holding up to moisture. If you do decide to go with MDF I would suggest a European cabinet with no face frame. The cons of wood is that center panel on a door may shrink leaving an exposed finish line. I always gave my customers a touch up kit in case that happened. Not one ever came back to me with a problem. My experience with mitered doors has been the opposite. They don’t hold up as well to changes in temperature and separate more easily. I’ve had some sitting around the shop for a while in storage areas as well as stick and rails, and have problems with the mitered coming apart. The mitered are more expensive as well. If you go with a mitered door, make sure there is a tenon at the joint and it is pinned to give it extra support. Thermofoil doors come either as a one-piece door with a router making all the design or they can be made as a five-piece door. In my opinion, the one-piece doors look fake (because they are). 24 Likes Bookmark March 2, 2013 at 7:43AM

Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors

eagledzines / Linda Mayo I owned a custom cabinet shop and I would make unfinished cabinets for someone if they asked for it. I have been retired for a few years so I would very much like to know how MDF has improved. .(BTW– MDF means medium density fiberboard. It is actually wood fibers that are bound together in a resin. It is the resin that makes it hard. If the resin breaks down, it falls apart. Also, thermofoil is a shrink wrap around MDF.) The pros of MDF is that is doesn’t not shrink and it is harder. The material is cheaper to manufacture cabinets from. Whether or not that savings in cost is passed on to you, depends on the cabinetmaker. If it is used on the inside panel of a door, it will not shrink. The cons of MDF are that if you ever decide you want real wood, you can’t strip it. The shelves WILL eventually bend. If because of cost, you decide to go with MDF anyway, make sure you periodically turn the shelves upside down to offset this sagging. If you do decide on an MDF face frame, make sure you get plywood shelves, laminated to match the interior or if the interior is natural lacquer then stay with that for the shelves. The MDF I am familiar with is harder than wood but absorbs water faster. As was stated, the finish sits on top of the material and doesn’t sink into the wood. While it’s true that water damage can seep into wood as well as MDF, I have heard of too many more ruined cabinets that were MDF than wood. It is, in my opinion, more quickly damaged. Part of the reason for that is that the finish sits on top and doesn’t become part of the wood. The pros of wood are of course, the feel and look of wood. Also, if this is a kitchen you want to keep for a very long time, I would go with wood. Trends in cabinetry are constantly changing. With wood you can strip it later if you decide you want a different finish down the road. If you have a solidly built set of cabinets, you can change the look and they will still be valuable later. With wood, the finish itself is impregnated in the wood helping it to resist stains and water. Keep in mind too, that if you have cabinets with a face frame, the backs of the frames are not usually finished. This leaves MDF exposed on the back and unfinished. Wood beats MDF as far as holding up to moisture. If you do decide to go with MDF I would suggest a European cabinet with no face frame. The cons of wood is that center panel on a door may shrink leaving an exposed finish line. I always gave my customers a touch up kit in case that happened. Not one ever came back to me with a problem. My experience with mitered doors has been the opposite. They don’t hold up as well to changes in temperature and separate more easily. I’ve had some sitting around the shop for a while in storage areas as well as stick and rails, and have problems with the mitered coming apart. The mitered are more expensive as well. If you go with a mitered door, make sure there is a tenon at the joint and it is pinned to give it extra support. Thermofoil doors come either as a one-piece door with a router making all the design or they can be made as a five-piece door. In my opinion, the one-piece doors look fake (because they are).

Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors

Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors
Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors
Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors
Mdf Kitchen Cabinet Doors

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