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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

I’ve noticed a lot of kitchens and baths lately boldly employing patterned tile floors, walls and backsplashes. These tiles, mostly examples of Moroccan cement tile, are both contemporary and vintage and when mixed with modern cabinetry and details, can result in a truly showstopping look. But I have to wonder, will this look be timeless? Is it a risk worth taking in main space like a kitchen? Lets take a look at some examples and talk it through. This room just uses the patterned tile behind the range, which I love in combination with he rustic beams, brick and the sleek counter and cabinetry. Tom Scheerer does SUCH a wonderful job using this style of tile- this kitchen forgoes upper cabinets completely and allows the pattern to really take over. I personally NEED upper cabinets or shelves, so I would love some white floating shelves with this kind of look. This floor looks so fabulous, especially with the beams, shiplap walls and modern concrete sink. I really adore this and find it perfect for a beach house. Hmm, I’m noticing a beam theme here…. 🙂  This floor has the popular tumbling blocks pattern which is kept from looking busy by simple subway on the walls and open shelving. I adore this bathroom by Amber Interiors. The dark painted vanity paired with the patterned floor tile looks sleek- and the rug on top is a bonus! DRA-MA!  Lacquered green modern cabinetry looks so cool paired with the more traditional tile run right to the ceiling!  Note the wood floor too- I prefer this to more tile on the floor. A simpler play on this style in a small bathroom.  It gives a tiny space big personality. Another killer Tom Scheerer kitchen- this one from a spread probably 9-10 years old (or more!). And it looks TOTALLY modern today, right down to the cabinets- so here is one argument against the “trendy” stance on this look! An Emily Henderson designed kitchen- here is an example of when a mix of the floor tile and wall tile works, mostly because the counters are butcher block which softens that surface a bit. Two bathrooms employing a patterned floor, black clawfoot tub and white subway walls.  Both look super cool. There is a more modern pattern on this tile and paired with muted green cabinets it’s awesome. Quite stunning, actually. I posted this kitchen recently and I’ll posit it again because it’s SO damn good. I love everything about this space. DYING to use this tile on the left in a bathroom soon. Especially in a blue- like the shot on the right. The patterned tile gives this super modern kitchen more warmth and personality than if it were just marble or plain tile. Bold color limited just to the floor makes this bathroom bold but also totally serene at the same time. Black, white and yep, more beams! Classic meets statement! For tiles in this style check out Exquisite Surfaces, Popham Design, Mosaic House and Cement Tile Shop.  Overstock.com even has an interesting selection! So what do you guys think? Are you into this look?
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Colorful spice markets, bustling bazaars, sumptuous textiles, elaborate mosaics, Casablanca–when it comes to Moroccan design, it has a way of tapping into wanderlust-stricken hearts and our desire for something off the beaten path. For those who prefer the road less travelled, a Moroccan-inspired kitchen can help to quench your thirst for adventure. Tile is a longstanding tradition in Moroccan design that goes back centuries. Richly-glazed mosaic pieces and design seem to sparkle against the country's primarily dry, Mediterranean landscape. Strong and durable, ceramic tile was also a practical building material that was sturdy enough to stand the test of time. It's still a popular choice for traditional Moroccan homes today.
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Now more than ever, Moroccan tile can feel right at home among almost any kitchen design. The timelessness of Moroccan tile designs can be partly attributed to their versatility. Whether your style is traditional, eclectic, or contemporary, there's a way to incorporate Moroccan inspiration into your kitchen. Today, we'll show you five places you can add a splash of well-travelled flair into your kitchen decor.
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Contrary to popular belief, Moroccan tiles aren't all intricate designs and elaborate mosaics. By using sunny, Mediterranean-inspired palette, you can achieve a Moroccan-style kitchen with a solid backsplash without committing to a single design. Simply mix in decorative pieces that you can easily swap out as your style evolves. This kitchen echoes Moroccan style beautifully with its arched shelf and metalwork lantern. The square yellow tile in a straight set design sets a warm and sunny tone.
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Capturing natural beauty in geometric form, Moroccan tiles often rely on symmetry and repetition to create intricate patterns. Traditional hand-pieced tile, called zellij, is often brightly colored and complex. However, not all Moroccan tile is busy or even colorful. Sumptuous arabesque shapes, solids, fish scales and carved tiles also add to the mix. Whatever the shape, size or color, Moroccan tiles will add some spice to your space.
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

It’s tough to compete for attention with this fantastic range, vent hood and stone arch but, boy, the backsplash sure does a good job of it. These beautiful Moroccan blue tiles are hand made in Casablanca. You can mix and match the patterns to create a unique backsplash in your own kitchen. Backsplash: 4-inch square Fez tiles from Moorish Architectural Design.
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

I’ve noticed patterned tile being used as well and I like it. I’ve been thinking about retiling the backsplash in my kitchen. I think when choosing it you just have to be careful what color you choose. Don’t choose a trendy color unless you really love it and think you will love it for a while. Personally I would avoid orangey/golden yellow, avocado greens, peach, pink or purple. I would choose more neutral colors like black and white, blue and white, or brown and white. I moderately skilled DYIyer can retile a backsplash. If you don’t have huge backsplash area then there is less risk using a patterned tile.
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Moroccan Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Last but certainly not least, the pantry offers an unexpected opportunity to bring Moroccan style to your kitchen. Often overlooked, the pantry offers endless opportunities for trying colors and patterns you love that you might be hesitant to use elsewhere. The best part? You'll have a little Moroccan paradise waiting for you every morning as you reach in for the cereal.
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We added all the trim. The range is by Capital and the hood is Viking. The backsplash sets this kitchen apart from others, it was the perfect icing on the cake for us. The kitchen won the tile in a contest from Mission Stone and Tile. It is beveled arabesque tile, each one is individually set in place and then grouted.
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I’ve noticed a lot of kitchens and baths lately boldly employing patterned tile floors, walls and backsplashes. These tiles, mostly examples of Moroccan cement tile, are both contemporary and vintage and when mixed with modern cabinetry and details, can result in a truly showstopping look. But I have to wonder, will this look be timeless? Is it a risk worth taking in main space like a kitchen? Lets take a look at some examples and talk it through.
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A smart and stylish way to save space, recessed shelving is becoming commonplace in kitchens of every style. It's also the perfect spot to offer just a taste of Moroccan design and add an element of surprise to your space. It can also act as a small statement backsplash, so you might be able to splurge a bit on your favorite tile design without breaking the bank.
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I am absolutely positively and completely on #teampatterened tiles. I can completely understand how some would question their staying power and wonder if they would tire of them after a week or two, BUT, as someone who’s a bit of a maximalist, I think they are such a fabulous addition to a kitchen, bath, outdoor space, stair risers, etc. In many many European, Carribean, South American, Middle Eastern, and Asian nations patterned tiles are the norm, and simple subway tiles are regarded as “questionable”. I think the idea of whether something is timeless falls on each of us individually. I think this look is definitely for someone who is grounded in their sense of style. Our kitchen has been under construction for months and my backsplash has been the one element Ive been hesitant on. Going with a classic subway tile would surely look great and be “timeless”. But, I couldnt pull the trigger because it didnt feel so for me. I am convicted in the fact that id get bored within a day. Ive really really been wanting patterned tiles and i keep going back to it so thats the way im going. I discovered Cement Tile Shop recently and love their selection and how surprisingly affordable the options are. Im so excited about it and i know 5 years from now when i walk into my kitchen it will still make my heart sing. Great post Erin. Loved all the examples.

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