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Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

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Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

Next Up Shaker Kitchen Cabinets Brush up on Shaker kitchen cabinet styles, and prepare to add a classic and stylish look to your kitchen design. Kitchen Cabinet Components and Accessories Gather all the info you need for kitchen cabinet hardware ideas and get inspiration from great pictures. Kitchen Cabinet Door Accessories and Components Dive into the range of available kitchen cabinet door accessories and components, and create a kitchen with style to spare. Kitchen Cabinet Components Get the information you need on the different components and accessories available for custom kitchen cabinets. Maximum Home Value Kitchen Projects: Cabinets and Hardware Follow these style and trend tips to update—and make buyers fall in love with—your kitchen. Small Space Solutions for Kitchens and Living Rooms 19 Photos Contemporary Shaker Kitchen Designer Mary Beth Hartgrove explains how she created a monochromatic kitchen with mixed materials and blended styles. Kitchen Island Components and Accessories Discover the best components and accessories for your kitchen island, adding flair and function to your space. Casual Kitchen and Living Space San Francisco designer Tineke Triggs makes a smaller home feel more spacious by creating a light and airy great room.
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Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

Shaker Kitchen Cabinets Brush up on Shaker kitchen cabinet styles, and prepare to add a classic and stylish look to your kitchen design. Kitchen Cabinet Components and Accessories Gather all the info you need for kitchen cabinet hardware ideas and get inspiration from great pictures. Kitchen Cabinet Door Accessories and Components Dive into the range of available kitchen cabinet door accessories and components, and create a kitchen with style to spare. Kitchen Cabinet Components Get the information you need on the different components and accessories available for custom kitchen cabinets. Maximum Home Value Kitchen Projects: Cabinets and Hardware Follow these style and trend tips to update—and make buyers fall in love with—your kitchen. Small Space Solutions for Kitchens and Living Rooms 19 Photos Contemporary Shaker Kitchen Designer Mary Beth Hartgrove explains how she created a monochromatic kitchen with mixed materials and blended styles. Kitchen Island Components and Accessories Discover the best components and accessories for your kitchen island, adding flair and function to your space. Casual Kitchen and Living Space San Francisco designer Tineke Triggs makes a smaller home feel more spacious by creating a light and airy great room.
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Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

Premium Shaker Cabinets Shaker cabinets are a classic choice and a popular option for a contemporary yet timeless look that never looks out of place in a family home. The Shaker style is a distinctive type of kitchen cabinet originally created by the Shakers, a group that believed in the value of well-made, utilitarian furniture of simple design. This minimal style with recessed panels on the doors is now a classic cabinet choice, fitting just as well into traditional kitchens as it does in kitchens inspired by everything from sandy beaches to the French countryside. If you seek to create a sophisticated yet inviting atmosphere in your kitchen, shaker style cabinets can be a perfect choice. We carry a wide variety of colors and brands. So, shop our Shaker style cabinets and update your kitchen cabinets today.
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Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

Shaker Kitchen Cabinets Our most popular style of kitchen cabinet is shaker, which refers to the style of the door. A shaker style cabinet is characterized by a five-piece door with a recessed center panel. Some shaker cabinet door styles are very clean and simple, while others have decorative edge detailing. The drawer fronts of shaker cabinets can also differ. Slab drawer fronts are often selected for modern designs, while five-piece drawer fronts are popular for transitional kitchen designs. Shop Now
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Shaker Kitchen Cabinets

Our most popular style of kitchen cabinet is shaker, which refers to the style of the door. A shaker style cabinet is characterized by a five-piece door with a recessed center panel. Some shaker cabinet door styles are very clean and simple, while others have decorative edge detailing. The drawer fronts of shaker cabinets can also differ. Slab drawer fronts are often selected for modern designs, while five-piece drawer fronts are popular for transitional kitchen designs.
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Ball Bearing Glides Butt Doors Cam Locks Center Stile Concealed hinge Dado Dovetail Epoxy Coated Glides Exposed hinge Face frame Framed Frameless Full Extension Glides Full Overlay Half Overlay/Partial Overlay Inset Medium density fiberboard (MDF) Melamine Miter Mortise and Tenon Overlay Partial overlay/Half Overlay Particle board Plywood Rail Raised Panel Recessed Panel Reveal Self Closing Drawers Sidemounted Glides Slab Front Soft Close Drawers Stile Undermount Glides Veneer Still have questions? Email us at [email protected] today! Ball Bearing Glides – Smooth gliding guides that are usually side mounted. These guides slide on small metallic balls that bear the weight of the drawer. Back to Top Butt Doors – Door on a double door cabinet that when closed, nearly touch each other. Typically, a 1/8″ gap is allowed between the butt doors. Back to Top Cam Locks – A cylindrical lock or fastener commonly used for cabinets. Often there will be a male and female part. Once inserted, simply turn the metal piece 180 degrees clockwise to lock into place. Cam locks are an easy and secure way to connect cabinet panels. They are commonly found in ready-to-assemble cabinets. Back to Top Center Stile – Vertical strips of wood that divide cabinets for extra support and durability. Usually seen on larger width cabinets. Back to Top Concealed hinge – a hinge that is not visible on the front of a cabinet door. Concealed hinges are attached to the inside surface of the door. Back to Top Dado – a groove that is cut into a piece of material so that another piece may slide into it. The inside surface of cabinet drawers may be ‘dadoed’ with a groove to accept the drawer bottom panel which helps make for a stronger joint between the drawer side and bottom panels. Back to Top Dovetail – Woodworked joints that are used to connect drawer sides to the drawer face without the use of exposed hardware. These joints are known for their durability. The wood is cut in a series of angled portions that look like dove tails. These “tails” interlock and are difficult to separate once attached. Back to Top Epoxy Coated Glides – A fast drying white protective coating that is baked into hardware metal guides. It is low VOC and can be used for sidemount and undermount hardware. Back to Top Exposed hinge – a hinge type that is visible on the outside edge of the cabinet door when the door is closed. Back to Top Face frame – the wood frame that is attached to the front edges of the top, bottom and sides of the cabinet box. The door gets hinged to the face frame. This frame helps provide rigidity to the box. Cabinet designs that incorporate this feature are called “framed” or “face-frame” cabinets. Back to Top Framed – a cabinet design that uses a ‘face-frame’ which is typically a wood frame attached to the front edges of the cabinet box (where the door gets hinged to). Back to Top Frameless – a cabinet design that does not use a frame on the front outside edges of the cabinet box. The front of the cabinet box is formed by the edges of the top, bottom and side panels of the cabinet box. The cabinet door typically covers these edges when closed. Back to Top Full Extension Glides – Hardware that provides full-access to drawers and allows the drawer to pass the face frame. Back to Top Full Overlay – A cabinet design whereby the cabinet door or drawer front covers the entire face frame so that only the cabinet door is seen with no part of the face frame visible. A cabinet is also considered full-overlay when the reveal is less than ¼ inch. Back to Top Half Overlay/Partial Overlay – A cabinet design whereby the cabinet door or drawer front partially overlaps the face frame. When the drawers/doors are closed, more than ¼ inch of the face frame remains visible. Back to Top Inset – a cabinet design whereby the doors fit inside of the face frame when closed (rather than overlapping and sitting on top of the face frame). Back to Top Medium density fiberboard (MDF) – a wood-based product that’s produced by the combination of very small wood fibers and a glue, resin or similar bonding agent. MDF can be more easily shaped than products like particle board due to the consistency of the material formed by the small fibers. MDF can be used for shelves, doors (typically painted or covered with melamine) and other cabinet parts. It is very dense and resists warping. It is commonly seen in the center panels of recessed cabinet door styles (like a Shaker door) to prevent warping and cracking of the center panel during the wood’s natural expansion and contraction throughout the year. Back to Top Melamine – a durable plastic, similar to laminate that can be applied to certain areas of cabinets. It is easy to clean and resists stains, chipping and fading. Back to Top Miter – A woodworking joint where two beveled pieces adjoin to make a 90 degree angle. Back to Top Mortise and Tenon – a means of wood joinery that involves part of one piece being inserted into a notch or hole in the mating piece. A typical mortise and tenon joint has a square protrusion coming off the end of one piece that fits tightly into a square ‘hole’ or notch in the piece it’s joined to. The pieces that make up the outer frame of a cabinet door might be joined using this technique. Back to Top Overlay – Overlay refers to the amount of face frame that is covered by the cabinet door or drawer front. Back to Top Partial overlay/Half Overlay – A cabinet design whereby the cabinet door or drawer front partially overlaps the face frame. When the drawers/doors are closed, more than ¼ inch of the face frame remains visible. Back to Top Particle board – a wood product made up of very small wood pieces and fragments that are fused together with a glue or resin under mechanical pressure. Back to Top Plywood – an all wood product made up of several layers of wood with the grain direction running at different angles with respect to each other. This orientation gives plywood greater strength and stability in comparison to solid wood. It reduces the tendency of wood to split when nailed at the edges and reduces expansion and shrinkage, providing improved dimensional stability. Back to Top Rail – the horizontal pieces of a face frame or door frame (in contrast to a “stile” which is the vertical member of the frame). Back to Top Raised Panel – Doors that have slightly raised center panels. Back to Top Recessed Panel – Door style where the center panel is inset or recessed. A common example is a Shaker door style. Back to Top Reveal – The exposed portion between the end of the cabinet face frame and the door. Back to Top Self Closing Drawers – Drawers that have mechanisms or magnets that guide the drawer closed. These are not soft-closing. Back to Top Sidemounted Glides – Drawer hardware that is mounted on the side of the drawer. Back to Top Slab Front – A flat door panel with no design, moldings, recessed or raised areas. Commonly gives a more contemporary appearance. Back to Top Soft Close Drawers – Drawers containing a piston that respond to various levels of pressure and weight, absorbing the impact and closing the door slowly and safely. Back to Top Stile – the vertical pieces of a face frame or door frame (in contrast to the “rails” which are the horizontal pieces of the frame). Back to Top Undermount Glides – Drawer hardware that is mounted underneath the drawer. Undermount guides can usually carry more weight than sidemount guides. Back to Top Veneer – thin layers of wood applied to plywood or MDF before it’s treated with stain. Veneers can be used on the sides of exposed cabinets (for example, on the end of a run of cabinets) and on the interior surfaces of cabinet boxes. Back to Top

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