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Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets

4.5 stars – based on 93 reviews in categories News

Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets

I promise that the day will come when you will show up here and find the usual happy, positive Kristi rambling on about how much she loves DIY and loves her kitchen and loves the process, blah, blah, blah.  I’ll do everything in my power to try to make that happen tomorrow.  In fact, even if everything goes sideways today, I’ll still slap a smile on my face and fake it tomorrow.  I promise. But today?  Well, sorry, but today is not that day.  Today you get frustrated, angry, ready-to-throw-in-the-towel, exhausted, ready-to-cry, so-sick-of-this-stupid-kitchen, hating-everything-to-do-with-paint Kristi.  Today, I rant. So after my paint/clear coat issues this weekend, I backed up and reassessed.  Again, I wanted to use a latex paint on my cabinets.  Yes, oil-based paint is my favorite.  But in this kitchen — a kitchen that will be used much more than our last kitchen by my wheelchair-bound husband with poor muscle control and “bull in a china cabinet” syndrome — I don’t want to deal with something that will yellow over time and that is impossible to touch up when you get scratches and chips.  I want something that can easily be touched up when his metal foot pedals scrape against the cabinet doors. After much consideration, I finally decided that I would just go with Sherwin Williams ProClassic Interior Waterbased Acrylic-Alkyd Enamel.  After all, many of you have raved about how great this product is, and I figured since the color I chose (Derbyshire) is a Sherwin Williams color anyway, I may as well go with it. So off to Sherwin Williams I went, excited to have finally made my choice.  I asked the man at the counter if he could mix up the color I wanted in a satin finish ProClassic water-based enamel, and he told me it’ll be no problem.  But first he asked me about what I’m painting, what I’m using to prime the cabinets, and how I’ll be painting. I told him that I was spraying the doors, and he asked me what kind of sprayer.  HPLV?  Gravity sprayer?  I didn’t know what mine was called, so I described it to him.  He asked if it hooks up to an air compressor, and I said yes.  Then he said, “You can’t spray latex paint with that.”  I said, “Ummm…why not?”  He said, “Well, it just won’t work.  Those won’t spray latex paint.” I found that to be interesting since that’s pretty much the only thing I use my sprayer for, and it sprays latex paints beautifully.  I assured him it would work, and he assured me it wouldn’t.  Or shouldn’t. *Sigh*  Frustration. So after that exchange, I waited while he went off to mix my paint. About two minutes later he came back with the bad news.  They can’t mix Derbyshire in a satin finish ProClassic because it doesn’t come in a deep base required to mix such a dark color.  But he had another paint that he could mix it in. I didn’t want another paint.  I wanted ProClassic.  That’s specifically what I went there for.  But I reluctantly agreed to the other paint. While I was waiting, the man in line behind me asked, “Why are you painting kitchen cabinets with latex paint?  You know that oil-based paint is much better for kitchen cabinets, right?” I wanted to yell, “ARE YOU FREAKING KIDDING ME?!” but I didn’t.  Instead I just smiled and said, “Well, I do know, and oil-based paint is actually my favorite for kitchen cabinets, but I really don’t want to have to deal with the yellowing and the impossible touchups if it ever scratches or chips.” We continued our conversation, and by the time the Sherwin Williams man located the correct base in the non-ProClassic paint he had talked me into, I had changed my mind once again.  The man in line behind me had me doubting my decision, and wanting to use oil-based paint. So I asked the Sherwin Williams man about oil-based options.  He went on to explain to me that “the problem” with an oil-based paint is that he would have to give me an interior/exterior oil-based paint, and he would have to color match (!!) the color that I want, but their computer can’t read the yellow that’s in that green, so the color would be off. Imagine me with a dumbfounded look on my face as I’m listening to this Sherwin Williams man tell me that he would have to color match a Sherwin Williams color from a Sherwin Williams paint card in order to give me the Sherwin Williams color that I picked out in the Sherwin Williams paint that I want, but their computer system won’t be able to match it correctly because it can’t read the yellow in the paint color, so I actually wouldn’t end up with the Sherwin Williams color that I wanted because evidently that’s not possible. I felt like my head was about to explode.  How is it that Kelly Moore has this Sherwin Williams color in their system and can mix it in any paint you want, and Home Depot has this Sherwin Williams color in their system and can mix it in any paint you want, and Benjamin Moore has this Sherwin Williams color in their system and can mix it in any paint you want…. but Sherwin Williams can’t even mix their own freaking color in the paint I want because they can’t color match it?!?! I finally just asked for the paint card and left.  I sat there in my car, ready to pull out of the parking lot, but had no idea where to go.  To the left was Kelly Moore.  I hate their latex paint, but their oil-based paint is my favorite.  But I didn’t want oil-based paint.  Also to the left was Home Depot, home of Behr’s Alkyd Semi-Gloss Enamel.  It has great ratings, but the Home Depot in my area doesn’t carry this product for some reason.  Plus, I didn’t want semi-gloss paint.  And to the right was Benjamin Moore, home of Advance Waterborne Alkyd, which also has great reviews. I went right, and ended up at Benjamin Moore.  I walked in with my paint color, and within five minutes, the man had my Sherwin Williams Derbyshire paint color mixed in a gallon satin Advance paint.  No color matching necessary…they had the formula in their system. So I headed home with my new gallon of paint and renewed hope and energy to tackle this project head on. First, I sanded everything down, and then I sprayed the doors.  Let me just say that Benjamin Moore Advance paint sprays beautifully.  I mean, I couldn’t be happier with the doors. But the rest?  The parts that I painted with a brush?  Well, those look like absolute crap.  And once again, it’s super shiny.  And yes, the top part is dry in this picture. The doors…perfect… The hand-painted parts…horrible… Doors…satin… Hand-painted parts…super shiny and streaky… I want to scream!!! I’ve been told by so many people that both Sherwin Williams ProClassic and Benjamin Moore Advance paints are just as good as oil-based paints, and they go on just like oil-based paints. No.  No they don’t.  Not in the least.  It makes me wonder if people who say that have ever actually used oil-based paint, or if they’re just repeating what the commercials and sales people tell them. One of the major problems with this paint is that it dries so unbelievably fast.  So I would paint part of the crown moulding and top header, and by the time I can get down from the ladder, move the ladder over, climb back up, and paint the next section, the first section has already started to dry and has become sticky.  So as soon as my brush hits that area, it drags and leaves drag marks in the paint. Oil-based paint would never do that!  It’s funny because one of the major complaints that people have about oil-based paint, besides the smell and the headache of cleaning it up, is the slow dry time.  But that slow dry time is actually the very reason that things painted with oil look so much better and don’t have brush strokes. Had I known that this would dry so fast, I would have added lots of Floetrol to it.  But I was assured that with both ProClassic and Advance, Floetrol isn’t needed. Yes, it is. I’m not buying any more paint.  I’m done buying paint.  My only option at this point is to spray everything.  But first I have to sand.  Again.  And then I have to spend hours and hours doing precision taping, papering, and draping everything with plastic. I know in the end, I’ll probably be very happy that I was forced to spray everything.  But right now, I’m just having a  hard time seeing the positive side of this situation. But it will work out, and it will be beautiful in the end.  I won’t stop until it is. *end rant *slapping on fake smile in hopes that it’ll become real between now and tomorrow morning* FacebookPinterestTwitterGoogleMoreEmailPrintLinkedInReddit

Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets

best sherwin williams paint for kitchen cabinets 1

Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets
Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets
Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets
Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets
Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets

Best Sherwin Williams Paint For Kitchen Cabinets

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