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Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

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Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

1 Install the upper cabinet ledger • Create a line using the chalk line that runs the bottom length of the wall cabinets. • Temporarily drive a couple of long screws into the studs along the line marking the bottom of the upper cabinets to help support them while you’re installing. Tip: Some installers screw a board, called a ledger, along the entire length of the wall to hold the cabinets. The ledger works as long as the wall is flat and plumb. If it’s not, you’ll need to shim behind the cabinets to align them, and the ledger would get in the way. 2 Start with corner wall cabinet • Place the cabinet on the screws or ledger. If the cabinet isn’t plumb, slip shims between the cabinet and wall at the stud lines and adjust as necessary. • Drill and countersink two holes in each of the mounting rails inside the cabinet and drive 2 1⁄2-inch cabinet screws through the holes. • Check to make sure the cabinet is level front to back as well as side to side. 3 Install next cabinet and clamp • With a helper, rest the neighboring cabinet on the screw or ledger and line up the front with the cabinet you just installed. • Clamp the two cabinets together. Check for level and plumb, and shim between the wall and cabinet as necessary. 4 Drill holes for connectors • On frameless cabinets, drill the holes for connectors. • Screw the cabinets together. On framed cabinets, drill holes for 1 ¼-inch drywall screws in the recesses for the hinges to hide them. 5 Drill and countersink pilot holes • Drill and countersink two pilot holes through each of the mounting rails, centering the holes over the studs. (On some wall cabinets, the mounting rails are inside the cabinet. On others, they are hidden in back.) • Drive 2 ½-inch cabinet screws through the holes and into the studs. 6 Drill and countersink pilot holes • Hang the rest of the cabinets the way you hung the first ones, checking for level and plumb as you go. • Once all the wall cabinets are in place, remove the ledger screws or holding screws you installed in Step 1. • Trim any visible shims flush with the cabinet using a utility knife. 7 Apply moulding if needed • If you have a slight gap between the back of the last cabinet and the wall, cover it with strip of moulding. • Cut a piece as long as the cabinet; stain and finish it to match. • Nail it in place with a brad gun, and fill the holes with a putty made by the cabinet manufacturer to match the cabinet finish. 8 Cut filler strips if needed • If you have a gap between the side of the cabinet and an end wall or appliance, cut a filler strip to close it. • The cabinet manufacturer usually sells these strips.• Scribe the strip with a compass and cut along the line with a jig saw. • Slip the strip in place and attach it with drywall screws. 9 Install valance • A valance is a decorative piece that connects two wall cabinets above a sink. • Have someone help you hold the valance in position. • Drill and countersink pilot holes into the side of the cabinets on each side, and attach the valance with drywall screws.
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Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

In the truck: Masonry bits and screws Structural epoxy Plenty of nails and screws Routers, planers, ramset, cabinet lift, iron, 3m contact adhesive, lacquer thinner, compressed air bottle, touchup kit, various color putties, rags, dap 30 white caulking, Homax caulking tools, 2 x 4’s for shims. Better upgrade your truck! Now we need a tools manager with a window to check ’em out of. There will be something quite satisfying about that big rig pulling up to the job site, black smoke curling around the tail lights. Bandsaw, planer, jointer, shaper, radial arm, dust collector, horizontal boring machine, helicopter, trampoline, and definitely, definitely a belt sander. The only thing missing is the Colorflex caulking – lots of colours to take care of anything. What is it with the violent disgust for the belt sander? I’ve known many over the years, and they’ve all been very nice. Further, if you take that chisel you just used to remove the liquid nails from the concrete subfloor, and put it to the belt sander, in less than a half a minute it will shave the hair off your arm again. What’s not to like? I’m actually a very good installer and I’ve always had a belt sander. There are too many nails and screws in cabinets to rely solely on planes and saws. It’s true – a worn out 120 is the best thing for sharpening job site chisels. I find that whatever gives you the best job the fastest is the way to go. I’m in Canada and at 6.00 U.S a box it helps to clarify the issue. I need not mention that Canada has the highest taxes in the world. For what you use a belt sander, I use a small angle grinder fitted with a sanding disk. Cuts off nails slicker than scum off a Louisiana swamp. The uses are numerous. For those looking to get into installation, I suppose one needs to separate the trade into two subdivisions. First, cabinet and/or countertop installer for large housing developments or apartment complexes. Its not so much a premium quality install, but getting the job done on time, even if it means working very long hours to meet the deadline. You should be able to put all your tools on one two-wheel dolly. I have been able to get tools, ladder and folding sawhorses on one. I have seen guys raising their families doing this kind of work.
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Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

Power tools I never go to jobsite without: battery drill belt sander power planer jigsaw small router (Porter Cable installers kit, 3 bases) small tablesaw (a small shopvac can hook up to these to keep dust down) Finally, a handy cabinet on 10″ pneumatic casters with drawers galore for all those tools. Miter saw on top with fold up extensions, a small 10″ table saw in back, and a nice cubby hole for the levels. Built of 1/2″ birch, glued and screwed, then laminated to look professional. Mine also has one door with a compartment just big enough for my pancake compressor and hose. Cords hang from the sides. Handy as a pocket on a shirt! I’m curious as to what you need a belt sander for on a job site. The only thing I can think of is for an internal curve, otherwise I can get away with my Makita power planer. The belt sander is a must have. How do you get along without it? How do you scribe a countertop or end cabinet with a hand planer? I have a few small dollar items that make my life easier – holster for the screw gun, monster hook for the nail gun, and my Stanley mini flat bar (for a raisin’ and a pryin’). I hardly ever use a belt sander, but always use a Bosch 3 1/2″ power plane. Another “must have” is a laser jamb level. That is the best installation tool I have ever bought. The Laser Jamb products are super, and their service is even better. I just broke a piece on my pole, and called them to order a replacement. They sent one out at no charge, not even shipping. Don’t forget a good Stanley angle divider, too. Make sure you pack an assortment of shims (all sizes including flat and wedge types). Scribing counters and cabinets is done with a power planer. I can also cut down cabinets and doors with a jigsaw and power planer. A planer is a great tool if you know how to use it properly. Make sure you use cabinet hanging screws – don’t use drywall screws! Cabinet screws have a wide panhead and have a high tensile strength. They come in 2.5 and 3 inch. Try to get the ones that have the self drilling point, as they’re much easier going in.
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Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

Question I have a question for the veterans out there. I’m new to the cabinet installation field and would like some advice on what tools, hardware, and fasteners to include in my installation kit. I’m interested in learning what the must have stuff is, not including power tools, which I have covered. I know that there is a wide variety of installation situations, but I’m looking for guidance that will help me in most situations. Thanks for the help.
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Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

After the first peninsula cabinet is in place, anchor the cabinets that follow to permanent blocks on the floor. To do that, position the next peninsula cabinet and outline its base on the floor with a pencil (Photo 9). Then screw 2-by blocking to the floor after allowing for the cabinet base thickness (Photo 10). Don’t try to place or cut the blocks perfectly. They can be short of the cabinet end by a couple of inches and back from the inside of the cabinet 1/8 in. or so. That way you won’t have to struggle to fit the cabinet over the blocks. Screw the blocks into the subfloor with 2-1/2-in. screws spaced about every foot. Set the cabinet into place, level it with shims, then clamp and screw it to the neighboring cabinet and into the blocking.

Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools
Kitchen Cabinet Installation Tools

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