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Octagon Kitchen Table

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Octagon Kitchen Table

Now it’s time to turn your square into an octagon.  We used this OCTAGON CALCULATOR and plugged in the numbers of our square, which was 65×65 inches…..and then the calculator told us with a square that size, each of our sides would need to be 26 15/16 inches long.  So, we found the very center of each of our four side, then measured out from there to create the appropriate lengths, made marks, connected the marks and drew the diagonal lines.  Then we decided to use our CIRCULAR SAW to cut these diagonal edges nice and straight.  So we measured the distance from the blade to the edge of saw guide and then placed our really long straight edge at that distance from the pencil line.  Then we clamped the straight edge in place.  We checked the distance from the pencil line to the straight edge several times……to be sure if was the same distance as the blade from the edge of the saw.
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Octagon Kitchen Table

Okay, let’s get started.  But first…..we based our table construction off of these Ana White table plans.  However, those table plans were too small for what we wanted because even though her table is also an octagon, the sides are too small to fit 8 chairs around it.  So we adjusted many things throughout the entire set of plans…..but the main idea is still the same.  And her computer drawings are way nicer than anything I could have scratched out in any of my computer programs.  SO….familiarize yourself with that and then if you’d like to make your table top bigger (to fit 8 comfortably), longer legs, a sturdier base, a thicker table top edge (to make the table top appear thicker), beefier diagonal supports, and a few other things……I’ll show you what we did here! 🙂
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Octagon Kitchen Table

Choosing an octagon shape is not only easier than trying to make a circular table…..it also gives more of a current look to it, which we have fallen in love with!  Plus, it gives all 8 people at the table their own space and elbow room. Bonus!

Octagon Kitchen Table

So, we started looking for tables that were more of a circle shape or possibly an octagon shape, to fit the square dining area in this new house.  The trouble was, we didn’t want a small round table that would only fit 6, we wanted to seat 8, so that our family of 6 would fit comfortably….with the option of having extra space for company.  But holy smokes, have you tried looking for decent round-ish tables that seat 8?!?!  Yeah, not only was there not much to choose from as far as style goes…..but thousands of dollars!!!!  (Which is thousands over budget, HA!)
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Octagon Kitchen Table

Once we moved to Oklahoma (almost a year ago–wow!)……I quickly started to realize that not everything fit into this house the same way as our last house.  The rooms are different, the layout is different, and even my style is a bit different.  Once we started putting the kitchen stuff away, I realized that the kitchen nook wasn’t going to hold our old rectangle kitchen table the same way as our last house.  Which, I was completely okay with, because the table was in pretty rough shape and had pretty large gauges and scratches from moving with it twice.  It was a very inexpensive table anyway….and it was time for a change.
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Octagon Kitchen Table

Begin cutting your 1×4 poplar pieces down to the correct length of one of your sides, cutting the angle at 22.5 degrees.  Attach them to the edges of your table, by first adding a line of glue and then nailing them in place with a nail gun.  Be sure that the edge is complete flush with the top of the table….because the more precise you are now, the less you’ll have to sand later.  (The original table plans that we linked to above attaches these edge pieces along the bottom side of the table.  But we really wanted to give the illusion that our table top was really thick so we didn’t want any seams along the sides of the tabletop….so we opted to do it this way, and love the look of it!!!)
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Octagon Kitchen Table

Now, you can flip the table over again and test it over on your base.  But one last thing we decided to do to safeguard against warping boards and to add extra stability to each of those slats of wood in our table top……we added strips of hardwood on the under side of the table, making sure to keep them out of the way of the cross support on the table base.  We placed them perpendicular to the direction of all the boards and we attached the pieces of hardwood on their side, minimizing any sort of flexing of the hardwood strips.  We used the counter sink drill bit and then used 1 5/8 inch deck screws to secure them in place.
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Octagon Kitchen Table

Vinasville Dining Table Classy and unique arrangable dining table with bar shaped tubular metal in elegant dark bronze color finish. Table top is accented with bands of inlaid slate tiles. Thanks to glued, blocked and stapled corners, the piece is sturdy and durable.
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Vinasville Dining Table Classy and unique arrangable dining table with bar shaped tubular metal in elegant dark bronze color finish. Table top is accented with bands of inlaid slate tiles. Thanks to glued, blocked and stapled corners, the piece is sturdy and durable.Found by JuliaPet+1

Anyway, that’s when Steve and I started thinking about possibly making our own table.  We had a few other projects on the list and weren’t really “feeling” inspired to make a table.  And I think part of that was because we were super nervous about putting together a piece of junk that would fall apart.  Because, I don’t know, tables get used every single day, several times a day…..and we were a little intimidated by making something that would be worth our time.  So, we re-considered saving up to buy a table……but gave up again because, really, we couldn’t find anything reasonably priced that would fit the space AND sat 8 people instead of 6.
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Now, it’s time to attach a cross piece that fits right on top of the base.  You will need a 2×8 that is 61 inches long and two 2×6 pieces that are both 26 1/2 inches long.  Use your Kreg Zig to create some holes and screw these pieces together into a cross piece.  Rest it on top of the base and grab your level and be sure that these pieces are level.  (Also, be sure to test this out on flat ground, possibly taking it inside where the table will actually sit. You may have to sand down the top of the center post until it’s nice and level…..which we had to several times, before our finished table top sat level.  In fact, we would recommend waiting on screwing this center cross support in place and adding the upper support beams until the table top is finished and you are sure everything is sitting level.)
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First of all, the original plans from Ana White shows how to create a hollow core for the vertical portion of the base.  We decided that since we were going to be making the table top bigger and it was going to be our main table (meaning, lots of use by kids, projects, etc), we wanted to be SURE it was sturdy.  So, we created a main post that would fit inside of the vertical frame of the base.
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We cut nine 1×8 poplar pieces down to 65 inches long.  (And one piece you have to rip down to 3 1/4 inches on a table saw.  Yours may need to be ripped down, more or less….it just depends on the accuracy of your boards.  But you want to create an exact square piece….so adjust as needed.)  Then we decided the order of the boards and how we wanted it to look with all of the different grain in piece.  Keep in mind the different colors in poplar stains really differently…..but Steve really wanted plenty of the dark purple grain in our table top, along with some of the green.  It doesn’t stay those colors….but it soaks in stain differently, giving the tabletop different shades of your stain color.
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Wow, that is so beautiful! I love the different colors in it so much that your table convinced me to try poplar. I’ve purchased poplar and all the stains you used, and will try to follow your steps, which were so perfectly detailed. Thank you. *One question though, I didn’t see you mention the use of either shellac or wood conditioner, were either of those used? I once screwed up a color on an item, all because I forgot to use the conditioner and I couldn’t sand it again, because it was veneer. That is actually why I am making a table top now. Wish I could make one shaped as yours, but my space doesn’t permit. Thank you again.

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